Comments: What's for Pud? Grown-up Bread and Butter Pudding

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as far as I have always believed (and it happens that sometimes [quite often?] I am wrong), bread pudding is also known as "chester cake" - see if the criitic has ever heard of that. No need to waste a long distance phone call on it though, we can wait til he gets home ;)

good job with the prunes.

Good heavens, Sam, you are quick off the mark! I'm still correcting typos on this post...!

Thanks for hosting the event - a fun idea! And HAPPY ST. GEORGE'S DAY!!! (Seen any dragons??)

Very interesting.This is the recipe I was looking for.Thanks for the same.


too many .?????

That wikipedia entry was written by a Brit. I've never seen bread pudding like that. Suet?

As one who lives in a former Dominion (Canada) and still appreciates our ties with Her Royal Highness, I'm glad to see you taking part!

Gorgeous pudding ...

I'm with Barrett on this. My grandmother never put suet in bread pudding. In fact I can't really figure out what it would _do_. The baking isn't really long or hot enough to render the suet much, so you just wind up with bread pudding studded with little fatty gristly bits.

Sure, it may be stodgy, but you need that as a buffer because the whole purpose of bread pudding is as a medium for eating hard sauce: butter, sugar, and whiskey heated together and mixed into a thick syrup. If the alcohol all boils off you're heating it too long. Pour it on the bread pudding and watch the party get jolly.

It's important _not_ to use any supermarket sliced bread as they all turn to disgusting slime in bread pudding. French bread pieces, failed home baking projects, and country loaves work better. I discovered that leftover fruitcake also makes a killer bread pudding.

JLC

Barrett, my Fannie Farmer only has a recipe for Bread and Butter pudding, and it resembles the British one. In any case, this post was supposed to be about English desserts!

Cambias, a friend recently send me a message about an article she saw that called for using stale hot cross buns for a bread and butter pudding - I thought that sounded like a great idea but was already tied to my brioche version! (Plus, making the dessert on Easter day, the buns were still fresh and lovely and it would have been a waste!) Still, it's a great idea!

And JLC - on another note it's great to see confirmation you're kicking around. Say hi to the dino-specialist for me.

I can confirm the bread pudding vs. bread and butter pudding impressions. I got bread pudding here in the U.K. and it was horrid. Dry, dense, and not very sweet. No sauce either.

Bread and butter pudding is more like the U.S. version, but more runny and not as alcoholic as you'd find in New Orleans bread puddings.

But they have other puddings that make up for the lack. Sticky toffee pudding puts bread pudding in its place, and I had a sticky figgy pudding once that I'm desperate to duplicate.

So does anyone have the recipe for the UK type pudding then? I don't like overly sweet desserts(most American desserts) and I tried the dry UK version and liked it, it's kind of like cake isn't it?

So does anyone have the recipe for the UK type pudding then? I don't like overly sweet desserts(most American desserts) and I tried the dry UK version and liked it, it's kind of like cake isn't it?

Suet in bread pudding - of course!

You have to use ready grated suet (brand name of Atora in the UK) or you can use 'vegetable suet'. It does cook through the finished product but firms up again if eaten cold. You can use any kind of fat (margarine, etc) so trial and error will identify the best sort for you. It doesn't have to be stodgy though - it might be heavier than a mousse but I have had Bread pudding that is almost cake-like. If only I had the recipe . . .

Oh, and it is lovely hot with custard!

Has anyone got a recipe for bread and butter pudding but made with hot cross buns, apricots. alcohol and a baked custard?

Has anyone got a recipe for bread and butter pudding but made with hot cross buns, apricots. alcohol and a baked custard?

Bread and butter pudding is a British dessert, but I have never heard of it being dry or containing suet. The standard one uses bread (slightly stale is best), milk, sugar, Eggs and raisins. I find it is better to remove the crusts and sprinkle the top with sugar too. The result is a delicious moist dessert with a crispy top!

I have also made a variation of it using apple and cinnamon, where I first made an apple cinnamon sauce that was spread between the buttered bread. Then poured over the sugar, milk, egg mix and sprinkled top with more cinnamon and brown sugar.

If Bread and butter pudding is dried out then it is either over cooked or the bread has not had a good covering from the egg, milk and sugar mix.

Other variations of it add a bit of beer or try breaking up chocolate instead of using raisins.

What you're referring to and asking the recipe for is also known as Christmas pudding, suet pudding, or boiled pudding. I think it may also be called Scottish Clottie or something to that effect. My grandmother made it every year for the holidays.
It's very rich and very, very good. Although I recommend steaming vs. boiling.
Variations: Plum pudding, figgy pudding

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