Comments: Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding à la Franglais

Comments

OK, I have to ask -

add a little animal fat to it if you have any - bacon grease or goose grease are great

Do you have a lot of goose grease lying around? If so - how decadant!

Ah, it is like Sunday supper at Grandma's house--we grew up eating British classics at her house because Grandpa's parents were UK immigrants.

Though, Grandma wouldn't have used creme fraiche or mushrooms. The former she could not have gotten her hands on and the latter--Grandpa would not have approved of.

However, I approve of both--it sounds delish, Meg.

Actually, Barrett, you caught me out - it's duck fat I have in the freezer. You can get goose fat pretty easily here, though, from the butcher.

Barbara, we don't actually eat beef very often because the Critic once read an article about how much water it takes to raise cattle. But I can usually get it across without complaint if I serve it with pudding and gravy!

The difficult part, really, is getting it cooked enough for him and not too much for me. I've finally given up on my thermometer (it lies, randomly) and just go with my instincts!

Eh? Doesn't everyone have duck, goose & lard in their possession?
Well, okay so I'm out of lard.

Biggles

Meg - Duck fat is pretty lush too, I have say.

I often make Yorkshire pudding in small custard bowls rather than in the roasting pan - the roasting pan is required for gravy making. I preheat olive oil and a little butter in each dish. The resulting puddings are just as good as if they have been made with beef fat. And they have the added advantage of having more crusty bits because they are smaller. All get to have a WHOLE pudding (or two... or three) on their plates.

(I must admit that if we had duck or goose fat on hand, I'd throw a little of that in rather than butter.)

-Elizabeth

Mmmmm, Yorkshire pudding...

This looks scrumptious! I just made your (or should I say The Critic's) Toad in the Hole two nights ago. Yorkshire Pudding is yummy in a homey, comfort food way... I'm glad I've tried it again, because my first ever attempt wasn't great. You really can't be successful if you're stingy with the drippings!

Dr. Biggles. I am shocked.

How can you be out of lard? How? You?

I am never out of lard.

If I were to run out of lard and be unable to bake a pie when begged to by a husband or daughter, I would have to listen to the whining that would result.

So, it is safer just to never run out.

I like the recipe of your roast and pudding. I haven't had it for many years. However I am on a long quest for a lost recipe. Not many clues I'm afraid as I only made it once 3 years ago. It was a beef roast with a fairly long French name behind it that I think started with the letter B. About all I can remember is that it called for an astounding number of garlic cloves stuffed into slits. It had a rub, not sure if it was a dry one or used dijon. It was the most awesome roast I have ever had and not very garlicky considering.

I like the recipe of your roast and pudding. I haven't had it for many years. However I am on a long quest for a lost recipe. Not many clues I'm afraid as I only made it once 3 years ago. It was a beef roast with a fairly long French name behind it that I think started with the letter B. About all I can remember is that it called for an astounding number of garlic cloves stuffed into slits. It had a rub, not sure if it was a dry one or used dijon. It was the most awesome roast I have ever had and not very garlicky considering.

I like the recipe of your roast and pudding. I haven't had it for many years. However I am on a long quest for a lost recipe. Not many clues I'm afraid as I only made it once 3 years ago. It was a beef roast with a fairly long French name behind it that I think started with the letter B. About all I can remember is that it called for an astounding number of garlic cloves stuffed into slits. It had a rub, not sure if it was a dry one or used dijon. It was the most awesome roast I have ever had and not very garlicky considering.

Yo, if you're making roast beef and yorkshire pudding it should be served with gravy, plus mustard or horseradish. NOT 'wild mushroom and creme fraiche sace'

Sorry to burst the bubble, I grew up in Yorkshire (Harrogate), and that is not a picture of a real Yorkshire Pudding!
Yorkshire Pudding is supposed to be light and airy not dense and dreary.
Try using plain flour to make it rise or find a recipe from a Yorkshire chef you will be pleasantly surprised.
Kind regards,
Peter.

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