From Too Many Chefs - www.toomanychefs.com

March 23, 2006
Spicy Peanut Sauce for Crudités

peanutdip_jf.jpg While searching for an appetizer that would be Asian-esque in flavor to go with a main course of stir fry for a dinner party, The Ambassatrix stumbled upon this recipe for peanut sauce in a, for lack of a better term, pamphlet that was free with our Bon Appétit subscription entitled Best International Recipes. We hardly ever open this thing up, but I'm glad we did because we found a pearl of a recipe. It makes about 1 1/3 cups and keeps well in the fridge for many many days.

It's a perfect blend of sweet and spicy with just a hint of tang.

And no, to answer your question, it's not an authentic international recipe. But we felt it had an Asian flair to it. Not exactly gado gado, but good nonetheless.

Spicy Peanut Sauce for Crudités

1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 large shallot, chopped
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/8 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
1 cup (or more) broth of your choice (recipe calls for chicken, I use homemade veggie)
½ cup creamy peanut butter (do not use old-fashioned or freshly ground)*
4 teaspoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon (packed) brown sugar

*I don't know what they mean here. I use natural peanut butter (ingredients: peanuts)--maybe that's "old-fashioned" but it turns out great. I can't imagine using Skippy for this.

Heat oil in nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add shallot, ginger and garlic; sauté until shallot is tender, about 3 minutes. Add curry powder and crushed red pepper. Stir until aromatic, about 15 seconds. Stir in 1 cup broth, peanut butter, lime juice, soy sauce, and brown sugar; whisk to blend. Simmer until mixture thickens, whisking constantly, about 3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl and cool, whisking occasionally. Cover and refrigerate 2 hours. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep refrigerated.) Thin dip with more broth by tablespoonfuls if needed. Serve dip chilled or at room temperature.

Posted by Justin in Bogotá at March 23, 2006 8:02 AM
Comments

I think they mean chunky when they say old fashioned...what ever kind you use, just make sure it is the creamy kind

Posted by jumper on March 28, 2006 at 6:14 PM

I don't know. The stuff I used was a little chunky. More important than texture (creamy or chunky) I think is the quality of the PB.

Posted by Justin on March 29, 2006 at 7:28 AM