August 10, 2004
Chicago Green City Market

Rainbow chard
Last week's speech by Eric Schlosser took place at the the Chicago Green City Market. The Chicago Green City Market, Chicago's "only sustainable green market", is held every Wednesday in Lincoln Park at 1750 North between Clark and Stockton between 7:00am and 1:30pm from May 19th to October 27th. What makes the Green City Market different from other farmer's markets around the city and around the country are the strict guidelines producers must abide by to be eligible for the market.

I have a copy of the questionnaire which probes deeply into the farming and production practices of prospective vendors. A sample of the questions -

4. What practices do you follow to produce a high quality product?
5. How do your production methods reflect "harmony with nature, showing care and respect for the earth." Explain.
7 a. Do you use any purchased products or inputs to control your weeds? Which? Describe your weed control practices:
7 b. Do you use any purchased products or inputs to control insects and disease? Which? Describe your insect and disease control practices:

Other questions ask for details of feed supplements, confinement practices, and health maintenance of livestock for those selling animal products, and questions that root out just how much of a processed product (like cheese, honey, jams, sandwiches) is actually made by the producer and how much is just assembled. It's a high standard. Getting into the market requires organic farming methods for foods produced locally (locally is understood to include Indiana, Wisconsin and Michigan, as well as Illinois), and under sustainable conditions that won't destroy the soil or harm livestock lines.

Why is this important? Not only do you get pesticide-free vegetables from a market like this, you also get better tasting vegetables and more variety. A commercial producer of tomatoes can only sell big round tomatoes that are picked green and gassed at the warehouse to induce the turn to red. An organic producer who is going to the Chicago Green City Market has control over the transport of the vegetables and fruits and knows they won't have to sit for long periods of time before being sold. He can pick an ugly but flavorful tomato or peach and bring it to market knowing it will find a buyer who will appreciate the intense flavor of fruits and vegetables allowed to grow and ripen naturally. Basically, better farming methods and local markets lead to better foods for you.

The market takes advantage of the rich talent pool of local chefs each week, who come to demonstrate techniques and dishes for which they are famous. Rick Bayless from Topolobampo and the Frontera Grill was the guest June 9th, Gale Gand from Tru and the Food Network's Sweet Dreams gave a demonstration July 21st, and tomorrow, Janice Martin from Tweet on North Sheridan Road will be in attendance. Paul Kahan from Blackbird will be the guest September 22nd, and on other days chefs from the Four Seasons, The Everest Room, Pili Pili, and the Milk and Honey Cafe will show their stuff. Recipes from these demonstrations are on their site.

That the market exists only for a short time each year and only on Wednesday mornings and early afternoons is Chicago's shame. That it exists at all is due to the pride and hard work of writer, chef, activist, and author Abby Mandel.

If there's justice in the world, Abby Mandel will eventually become better known for her role in developing the Chicago Green City Market, now in its 5th year, than for her best-selling cookbooks or the classes she teaches. Mandel writes a weekly food column for the Chicago Tribune and the Dallas Morning News that's run for the last 15 years, and is a former editor of Bon Appetit.

Her work with Chicago Mayor Richard Daley helped to bring the market into being in Lincoln Park. I hope she'll continue her work and try to expand the market's presence into a more permanent location where Chicagoans can enjoy local organic produce year-round.

I took a batch of photos at last week's market. The deep colors of the produce, the variety of products available, and the rich scents everywhere (especially by the herb tent) don't come across completely in these pictures, but I hope you'll get a sense for what you're missing if you don't get a chance to get to the market.

Posted by Barrett in Maryland at August 10, 2004 9:14 AM | TrackBack Print-friendly version
Comments

Look! Corn!

The produce at at a large Chicago food store chain does not look this good. Who did you pay to take these pictures?

I may have to take a trip into the city and check it out. Looks amazing. Just wish it wasn't quite so far from my Northwest Territories house.

Posted by Bryan on August 10, 2004 at 12:00 PM

I figured out where the lenscap was. It's amazing how much that helped.

The ironic thing is that you're closer to the prodcuers of much of this stuff where you are. Does Crystal Lake have markets like this?

Posted by Barrett on August 10, 2004 at 12:31 PM

“GREEN-CITY : A NEED FOR AN INTEGRATED AND COMPETITIVE GREEN LEGISLATION APPROACH"
10 Feb 2011

The issue surrounding the proposed highrise development in Jalan Medang Serai, Bangsar,Malaysia is not something new(see ‘Residents : Don't Toy With Our Safety’, New Straits Times/NST, 6 Nov.2009, p 10). However, this concern is only part of a larger tip of a submerged iceberg.


It appears- as is always- that KL Cityhall had actually approved the Medang Serai project without taking into account proper environmental assessment analysis(‘assessment’).


There is no indication that such assessment had been performed to the satisfaction of all stakeholders involved in the project, particularly the right of objection and 'social participation' by concerned residents.


Even if it is claimed that the Medang Serai Project is in line with the KL Draft Plan 2020(‘KL Draft’), the KL Draft itself is flawed in several aspects. Of major concern is the lack of a comprehensive environmental assessment within the different stages/periods of implementation as proposed in the said KL Draft.

Without an effective and competitive Green legislations(Green-laws) in place in Malaysia(and elsewhere in both developed and developing countries), green projects(Green-project) and green implementation (G-implementation) will remain mere rhetoric.

Achieving green building index-GBI status is only a step, if not a beginning of a Long Walk. In order to create a true Green city (Green-city)status even by 2020 standard, competitive intelligence requires a development of an integrated National Green Policy which do away with current fragmented policies which are impediments towards achieving the ultimate goal of a true Green-city status.


..........................
Jeong Chun-phuoc*
Lecturer-in-Law
An Advocate in Strategic Environment and Taxation Intelligence(SETI)
And a Reader in Comparative Syariah Studies.

Posted by JEONG CHUN PHUOC on February 9, 2011 at 10:28 PM


“GREEN-CITY : A NEED FOR AN INTEGRATED AND COMPETITIVE GREEN LEGISLATION APPROACH"
10 Feb 2011

The issue surrounding the proposed highrise development in Jalan Medang Serai, Bangsar,Malaysia is not something new(see ‘Residents : Don't Toy With Our Safety’, New Straits Times/NST, 6 Nov.2009, p 10). However, this concern is only part of a larger tip of a submerged iceberg.


It appears- as is always- that KL Cityhall had actually approved the Medang Serai project without taking into account proper environmental assessment analysis(‘assessment’).


There is no indication that such assessment had been performed to the satisfaction of all stakeholders involved in the project, particularly the right of objection and 'social participation' by concerned residents.


Even if it is claimed that the Medang Serai Project is in line with the KL Draft Plan 2020(‘KL Draft’), the KL Draft itself is flawed in several aspects. Of major concern is the lack of a comprehensive environmental assessment within the different stages/periods of implementation as proposed in the said KL Draft.

Without an effective and competitive Green legislations(Green-laws) in place in Malaysia(and elsewhere in both developed and developing countries), green projects(Green-project) and green implementation (G-implementation) will remain mere rhetoric.

Achieving green building index-GBI status is only a step, if not a beginning of a Long Walk. In order to create a true Green city (Green-city)status even by 2020 standard, competitive intelligence requires a development of an integrated National Green Policy which do away with current fragmented policies which are impediments towards achieving the ultimate goal of a true Green-city status.


..........................
Jeong Chun-phuoc*
Lecturer-in-Law
An Advocate in Strategic Environment and Taxation Intelligence(SETI)
And a Reader in Comparative Syariah Studies.
He can be reached at Jeongphu@yahoo.com

Posted by Jeong Chun-phuoc on February 9, 2011 at 10:31 PM
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